The AdlerOaks Music Library publishes contemporary choral, orchestral, and chamber works of James Adler. Works published by AdlerOaks are available through a number of distribution sources. Check out the list of works for score and sound samples and ordering details.

Homages & Remembrances

We are thrilled to announce the newest CD by James Adler: Homages & Remembrances. James Adler has recorded a recital that pays homage to people who have been great influences and offers musical remembrances of important people in his life. The longest work on the program, Pictures at an Exhibition, is dedicated to his mother and his aunt, both of whom encouraged him in his pursuit of music. Also included is a new work by James Adler: Elegy for Norman with flutist Cain-Oscar Bergeron.

Buy the CD now at Albany Records or Arkiv Music.

Read what they’re saying

Here's what they're saying about Homages & Remembrances:
James Adler plays in an incredibly imaginative way...He succeeds in creating a truly exciting and fascinating interpretation...We could give our readers more details, but the best thing is to listen to the recording. — Pizzicato
Adler’s ['Elegy for Norman'], which is for flute (played by Cain-Oscar Bergeron) and piano, is gentle and rather sweet. — Infodad
James Adler's sound is a real pleasure. — Pizzicato
Mussorgsky’s 'Pictures at an Exhibition'…gets an absolutely first-rate rendition here… he grasps the essence of each miniature and presents it with skill and refinement. — Infodad

CD Release Recital a Success!

On November 12, Mr. Adler performed selections from "Homages & Remembrances" at the Yamaha Artist Piano Salon. Here's what the critics are saying:
Mr. Adler also gave fine, bracing performances of Debussy’s popular “Deux Arabesques.” He treated them robustly, with strong shaping, clarity, and body. His reading of Rachmaninoff’s Prelude Op. 23, No. 6, was similarly strong and present, showing a particular sensitivity to the crossing of melodic lines and the harmonies created in the process. — Michael Miller, New York Arts
I wish I spent more evenings as enjoyably as this one. Thank you, James Adler! — Michael Miller, New York Arts
[Adler] made the piano sing as if the sonata were a Classical opera in miniature. Adler invested the allegro con spirito with all the anticipation found in an overture; realized, in the andante con espressione, the tears beneath the lightness of a gentle heroine’s less-than-serene meditation; and made the rondeau’s summing up into a finale in which all the disparate threads of the plot resolve, all voices have their say, and order reigns. — Bruce-Michael Gelbert, [Q]onStage.com